Category Archives: Wild and Wonderful

N is for New Zealand -South Island

If you only ever intend to see one island in New Zealand (and both are definitely worth it) then the South Island delivers bang for buck.

Home to the best sauvignon blancs in the world in the Marlborough region, spectacular fjords, glaciers, and some lovely rail journeys, the South Island will give you a good overview of the country and its people.

The crossing from Wellington on the North Island to Picton on the North Island by ferry is three and a half hours of lovely scenery.  If you are hiring a car the car company will take your vehicle used in the north and give you a new one in the south island on arrival, so remember to take all your belongings out of the car.  Exploring Marlborough Sound gives you access to some great coastal walks as well as vineyards and a burgeoning food and wine experience.

Marlborough wine country

Travelling across the island and down will bring you to Greymouth, the end point of the TranzAlpine railway that runs from Christchurch.  Check out the local brewery, and if you are into adventure activities, quad biking is just one of many activities available.

Continuing south along the west coast and you travel through Hokitika, crafts and jade or greenstone country, down to Franz Josef Glacier, one of two on this coast.  The glacier is right by the road so very accessible.  A little further south and Fox Glacier is the second accessible glacier.  Here you can walk on the glacier with crampons after hiking through forest, and the helicopter ride is great fun.  South again and you will need your camera charged as the views to the Tasman Sea unfold on this gorgeous stretch of coast.

Haast Pass takes the road inland towards Queenstown and across the mountains.  Again, the camera will be working overtime as the views around every corner are breathtaking.  Mountains, lakes, valleys – gorgeous.  Wanaka is home to both the lake for which the town is named, and to great skifields.   It is also the site for Warbirds over Wanaka, an airshow of international repute.   Next stop Arrowtown just out of Queenstown.  Adventure seekers will try the jetboats; those preferring less getting drenched and more cultural pursuits will enjoy the local craftshops.

Everyone who goes to Queenstown regrets not staying longer. Plan for at least four nights here.  The town sits between two lakes and is surrounded by mountains and in the winter ski runs.  Filled with great souvenir places, all kinds of different restaurant options, including the restaurant at the top of the chairlift to the top of the mountain, and hub for day tours out of the town, Queenstown is lively, friendly and in the heart of everything.  This is where the bungy jump (using a cord not vines) was born and  it is close to several sites  where Lord of the Rings was filmed.  You can take a four wheel drive tour to Skippers Canyon – not for the fainthearted!  Or if a bygone era is more your style, a trip on the Earnslaw, a steamer boat is a lovely option.

Two hours south is the little town of Te Anau.  If you plan to see Milford Sound and Doubtful Sound, consider staying in Te Anau.  It cuts off two hours travel time in each direction and makes for a far more relaxing experience.  Most tourists will see Milford Sound – smaller, more dramatic and closer to Queenstown that Doubtful Sound, but be prepared.  There is generally one good day in four so you are most likely to see it in cloud and with local waterfalls.  On a  good day, the reflections are spectacular of Mitre Peak in the sound.

Milford Sound

Doubtful Sound is less often visited on a first trip, but is a must for a second visit. Bigger than Milford and with a wealth of wildlife, the Sound offers New Zealand fur seals near the ocean, and curious dolphins that follow the ship.  Bird spotters will also be able to check out the local inhabitants here.

This area also has some world famous hiking trails – tramping in New Zealand parlance.  The Milford Track and the Hollyford Tracks are just two – there are many in New Zealand on both islands.

South again brings you to the southernmost part of New Zealand’s South Island.  Invercargill boasts the most consistent weather in New Zealand – permanently cold!  Try fishing, watersports, birdlife and the trip to Stewart Island the most southerly part of the country will give you a chance to see kiwis in their natural habitat.

Across to the east coast and the Scottish-feel city of Dunedin.  University city, home to Cadbury’s Chocolate factory and a brewery, you an also see Lanarch castle – indeed you van stay there is you wish.  Bird watchers will find the Albatross Centre here.

North to the centre of the island and Mount Cook , the highest mountain in New Zealand offers great views on a clear day.  If not, the hot chocolate is good.  Onward to lake Tekapo and the tiny church on the lake’s edge. North again to Christchurch, the largest city on the South Island and renowned for the earthquakes that flattened much of the city including the landmark Christchurch Cathedral.  It is taking some time but the city is rebuilding, and in the meantime see the popup shops and restaurants housed in shipping containers.  Twin city to Adelaide ( my hometown) and planned by the same Colonel William Light, the city has a beautiful park and the River Avon lets you try punting.

If you are flying out of Christchurch and it is an afternoon flight, a great thing to do is visit the Antarctic Museum.  Have a ride on an actual Hagglund vehicle used on the ice, check out the wildlife on the Antarctic and experience a blizzard.  Well worth a couple of hours.

The transcoastal railway runs from Christchurch north.  Just check that earthquake damage has been repaired.  Visit Kaikoura for dolphin encounters – there is a population of dolphins permanently in the bay, whale watching and swimming with seals.   And if relaxation and spoiling yourself is part of the agenda, the mineral and hot springs area of Hamner Springs will soothe and replenish you.

You will need it if you try to do everything New Zealand has to offer!

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Safe Places to travel in 2018

As we draw towards Christmas and some much needed downtime, thoughts turn to plans for 2018 and travel.  In a world increasingly beset by terrorist attacks, volcanic ash and other disasters it can be difficult to pick a place you feel is safe and worth seeing.  So it is good to have an independent source name the top 5.

A recent survey has named the following countries as the world’s five safest to visit.

The latest top 5 safest places are as follows
1. Finland – 6.65
2. UAE – 6.6
3. Iceland – 6.57
4. Oman – 6.49
5. Hong Kong – 6.47
All great destinations. Oman and Iceland are at the top of my list with Finland close behind. I have been to the UAE and Hong Kong so I can give you first hand knowledge and experience here.

Finland offers elegant modern design, fascinating culture and easy proximity to Russia and the rest of Scandinavia, and Finnair hubbing through Helsinki is one of the most efficient airports on the planet.

Many people have hubbed through Dubai especially since direct flights began several years ago out of Adelaide, but take the time to visit.  Plan your visit for November to February for the coolest time of year, but even in summer – which can be brutally hot, everything is air-conditioned right down to the bustops.  A desert dinner under the stars will reconnect you with the vastness of the night skies and the silence of wild places.

Iceland has been on my list to see since I discovered Game of Thrones use it for a great deal of their filming, but fan or not, this is a spectacularly beautiful place.

I put together a tour to Oman a couple of years ago that did not gain traction, but it is time to revisit and put this on your list.  Beautiful, surprising, welcoming and safe, it is  FABULOUS destination.

And Hong Kong is Asia writ large – tall building, tiny villages, a bustling harbour, incredible shopping and fantastic food.

Let me help you plan a great trip to a safe place.

Have a wonderful Christmas and a safe happy break and see you in the new year.

 

N is for New Zealand

New Zealand is one of Australia’s nearest neighbours and our links go back to the ANZAC tradition and before.  Regularly referred to as across the ditch, New Zealand is a few hours flight from Australia and one of the greatest places to go for all sorts of reasons.

Showcased by New Zealand director Peter Jackson in the trilogy Lord of the Rings and again in The Hobbit New Zealand is spectacular in scenery, rich in history and Maori culture, is home to the best sauvignon blancs on the planet (just my opinion but I haven’t tried a Marlborough sav blanc I haven’t liked) and home of the adventure and adrenalin junkies best fixes.

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Auckland is the largest city and main gateway, but Wellington in the south of the North Island is its capital.   Auckland is on two harbours and water sports are a way of life.  Take a ferry across the bay and explore a local village neighbourhood.  Take a sail on an America’s Cup boat.  Explore the city on the morning tour and climb an extinct volcano.  Adrenalin seekers can try the Auckland Tower.

North of Auckland is the Bay of Islands area.  Check out the dolphin cruise from Paihia or Russell and view the Hole in the Rock as well as some very upmarket homes.  While in this region visit the Treaty Ground and explore historic Russell, on a island a three minute ferry from Paihia and if you enjoy a walk and don’t mind a bit of a climb, the views from the lookout are spectacular.

Hole in the Rock Cruise

Check out the glowworm caves at Waitomo south of Auckland, and make time to visit not just the main cave, but one of the other two as well.  Two Dogs cave is fascinating as is the history of how they found the cave ( the hint is in the name) and there are glowworms here too.

Rotorua is the centre for Maori culture.  Enjoy a hangi and savour superbly cooked food done in a traditional earth oven – yum.  Visit the thermal centres in the town and also nearby.  See the world the way it was when it was young – New Zealand is relatively young and still quite geothermically active.

rotorua-trilogy

Let the cares of the world wash away in the hot springs and have a mud scrub and massage for relaxation and rejuvenation.

Lake Taupo is the largest lake in New Zealand is there is permanent snow nearby.

If architecture is of interest to you it is worth the drive ( but fill up in Lake Taupo because there are no petrol stations on the road) to Napier on the east coast.  Devastated by earthquake in 1930 the city was rebuilt in Art Deco style and the walking tour is absolutely worth doing.  South after lots of very rural scenery – extremely contented cows and sheep –  is the town of Marlborough, a wine making area worth a look.  If you take the first signpost to the wineries you won’t find the wineries, but you will find a New Zealand quirk – their version of Stonehenge for the southern hemisphere.

Over the pass and south to Wellington.   Capital, affectionately called the windy city,  it is home to a fabulous museum, a sweet little zoo and great views from the cable car top station.  It is quite hilly so be prepared for some climbing or use the lifts that go up the hill usually found in shopping malls.

Wellington city-views

Wellington is the departure point for ferries to the South Island, but I have gone on too long already.  I will keep the South Island for next.

K is for Kenya

If Africa is on your bucket list, Kenya may well be at the heart of it, and for good reason.

The annual migration between Kenya and Tanzania and back again sees literally millions of animals and birds follow the rains to fresh water.  It is a sight few will forget.

The main point of entry to Kenya is the capital Nairobi.  You can stay at the Giraffe Hotel and have these lanky giants pop their heads in the windows to join you for breakfast. The very long almost prehensile blue tongues will make short work of anything left nearby.

Giraffe Hotel Nairobi

Most travellers will head out quickly from Nairobi to explore the  Serengeti plain, and experience life as it has been lived for thousands of years.   The grass eaters – antelope, impala, wildebeest and zebra, to name just a few graze the plain and gather in the Ngorongoro Crater, and with them the predators.  Lion, cheetah and leopard  lie in wait and help cull the weak and old of the vast herds, strengthening the rest for the survival of the fittest.  And behind then come the scavengers, cleaning up the plains.

Ngorongoro crater

On the lakes enormous flocks of flamingos turns the blue to pink.

Flamingos Lake Nakuru

The Masai Mara have lived traditional lives on the plains of Kenya for thousands of years. Wealth is measured in cows, but water is the most precious gift of all.  Experiencing the red clad warriors performing their high jumping dances will remain with you.

Masai Mara

The migration follows the rains, but most likely viewing is between July and September.

Known as one of the seven natural wonders of the world, the wildebeest migration in Kenya and Tanzania will leave you awestruck, and amazed.

E is for Ecuador

Named for the Equator this South American country is one of those somewhat overlooked places.

The capital Quito, built on the ruins of an Inca city,  is one of the highest capitals in the world, perched in foothills of the Andes Mountains at 2850 metres.   With its Spanish conquistador history and impressive colonial churches  and fascinating old town area, one of the delights of Quito is the colourful local markets with great fruit and brightly decorated ceramics.  Further out explore ruins of ancient civilisations.

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Take a drive to the equator itself and you have an impressive monument of the actual line of the equator and several museums recounting the history of the exploration of the equator.  You can straddle both hemispheres here.

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Ecuador is home to one of the most remarkable island systems on the planet – the Galapagos Islands.  A flight due west from Quito will bring you to the main island and from there the best way to see the islands is on a cruise.  Manned by expert guides who will explain this unique island chain and ecosystem, you will explore several islands and meet the local marine iguanas, bright red crabs, multitudes of seabirds, and possibly the amazing equatorial penguin.   Nowhere else can you get so close to wildlife.  Not hunted by men or feral animals, you can literally walk centimetres from birds on nests and past sealions basking on the steps on the back of your boat.  It is the place that crystallised Charles Darwin’s work Origin of the Species and revolutionised our understanding of how life evolved on earth.  Check out the blue footed boobies, again unique to these islands.

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Let Ecuador delight you in so many ways.

C is for Canada

For Australians, Canada has an unmistakable attraction, and for all sorts of great reasons.

Canadians share a similar system of Government, they know who the Queen is, and they have a similar sense of humour.  Add to that a natural politeness their cousins to the south seem to have forgotten, and Canadians are amongst the most welcoming and friendly people you will meet.

Add to that a country that is simply spectacular in scenery, rich in history and very easy to navigate and you have one of the most popular countries for Australians – actually for anyone- to visit.

From west to east, north to south Canada offers a huge range of possibilities for the traveller.  Most people will enter Vancouver as their first port of call crossing the Pacific. Surrounded by sea, boasting the fabulous Stanley Park as home to recreation for the Vancouverites and offering every modern amenity, Vancouver is a very liveable city.  Check out the Granville Markets and cross by tub boat if you want a truly unique experience!  Visit Gastown for Vancouver’s history and explore the local shops, bars and restaurants. Capilano suspension bridge and now the skywalk on the edge will get you to dizzying heights over the gorge.  Vancouver is also the main gateway for the Alaska Inside Passage cruises.

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Capitol of British Colombia is Victoria on Vancouver Island.  It is possible to fly in or take a ferry.  The Parliament building dominates the harbour, as does the gorgeous Fairmont Empress Hotel.  Victoria boasts the only runway that closes for whales who have right of way over the seaplanes.  Famous for the Butchart Gardens, hundreds of thousands of people experience the beauty of these gardens created from a disused quarry every year.  Absolutely required viewing!

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If it is scenery you are after, look no further than the Rocky Mountains. Whistler for skiing and also summer activities, Sun Peaks for skiing as well, and the world renowned towns of the Rockies – Banff, Lake Louise and Jasper.  Mountains clad in snow or wildflowers and trees, lakes of emerald water, wildlife abounding.  The Athabasca snowfields will amaze.

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If you love your trains, the Rocky Mountaineer is hard to beat, but Canada’s ViaRail will also allow you to explore the country as well.  Rail to Whistler and into the north mountains at Quesnel, and try the transcontinental train from Vancouver to Toronto if you really love rail travel.

On the western edge of the continent lies the Yukon.  Gold has shaped the history of the province and for those with the urge to get off the beaten tourist track, this is a place of wide vistas and great adventures.

Speaking of outdoors – the Calgary Stampede is an annual spectacle in August.  Covered wagon races, First Nations culture and lots of fun for everyone.  Next time  -Eastern Canada.

Beach beauties

Did you know that there is such a job description as a Tourism Australia Aquatic and Coastal Ambassador?    Brad Farmer has that happy role  ( and yes, that’s a real job)!

He has put together a list of the top 10 beaches in Australia as below
#1 Cossies Beach, Direction Island, Cocos Keeling Islands, INDIAN OCEAN – pictured 

cocos-island
#2 Nudey Beach, Fitzroy Island, Far North Coast, QUEENSLAND
#3 Moonee Beach, Coffs Coast NEW SOUTH WALES
#4 Turquoise Bay, Coral Coast, WESTERN AUSTRALIA
#5 Burleigh Heads, Gold Coast, QUEENSLAND
#6 Maslin Beach, Adelaide, SOUTH AUSTRALIA
#7 Dolly Beach, Christmas Island, INDIAN OCEAN
#8 Shelly Beach, Nambucca Coast, NEW SOUTH WALES
#9 Boat Harbour Beach, North West Coast, TASMANIA
#10 Apollo Bay, Great Ocean Road, VICTORIA
 

We are really spoiled for choice when it comes to white sandy beaches and crystal clear waters.  Not all of the beaches listed above are hard to reach.  Maslin Beach is an hours drive from Adelaide CBD and the scenic Great Ocean Road will take you to Apollo Bay.  Burleigh Heads is a short drive from Coolangatta airport.

So if refreshing waters and fine white sand are on your agenda for a holiday, consider a few of these.

Hint :  Beaches are busiest over the summer period and especially over the Christmas New Year break.  If you want to truly explore and relax at one of these great places, book really early – now is good for December 2018!